Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. How am I coming through now, Charlie?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. You're very clear when you come through. It's just that your VOX is not keying at every word. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. These bite sized objects were designed to remove the problem of having so many crumbs floating around in the cabin, so they designed a particular size that would be able to go to the mouth all at once. I think since all of our experience, we've discovered that we could progress a good bit further than that back some of the type meals that we have on Earth. As a matter of fact, on this flight we've carried along pieces of bread, and along with the bread we have a ham spread; and I'll show you, I hope, how easy it is to spread some ham while I'm in zero g.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I think we've discovered that it is quite easy to *** you're all very familiar with.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. We notice your roll rate increasing. Will you please see if you can bring that down to about 04 or we'll be losing high gain shortly. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

You can also use zero gravity to demonstrate many things that we've all learned in school. I'd like to demonstrate briefly how easy it is to explain the action of the gyroscope. If I spin this can, we know that according to the equations of motion that we would expect that once this is given a spin, and has a spin axis in this direction, if we give it a particular torque, and I'll do this by pushing my hands against it in this fashion once it's spinning. By the equations we can predict that, as I put this torque on it, it will in fact rotate this direction. Let's see how well this works out.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

See that as I apply the torque this way, it's rotated this way.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. It's a pretty good demonstration.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, this next is a little demonstration for the kids at home, all kids everywhere, for that matter. I was going to show you how you drink water out of a spoon, but I'm afraid I filled the spoon too full and if I'm not careful, I'm going to spill water right over the sides. Can you see the water slopping around on the top of the spoon, kids?

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. Well, as I said, I was going to show you but I'm afraid I filled it too full and it's going to spill over the sides. I'll tell you what. I'll just turn this one over and get rid of the water and start all over again. Okay?

Michael Collins (CMP)

And you can see, up here we don't know where over is. One up is as good as another. That really is water, though. I'll show you.

Michael Collins (CMP)

That's really not the way we drink. We really have a water gun which I'll show you.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Here's the water gun. This cylindrical thing on the end of it is a filter with several membranes: one allows water to pass, but not any gas; the other allows gas to pass, but not any water. So, by routing the gaseous water which comes from our tank through this filter, we're enabled to drink purified water without the gas in it, filtered water. And, of course, all we do to—to get it started is just pull the trigger.

Michael Collins (CMP)

It's sort of messy. I haven't been at this very long. It's sort of the same system that the Spaniards used to drink out of wineskins at bull fights, only I think this is even more fun. Well, be seeing you, kids.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Thank you from all us kids in the world, here in the MOCR, who can't tell the Earth from the Moon.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. Stand by one, and we'll get you that Earth one.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Looks like you need a wine skin up there, Mike.

Michael Collins (CMP)

You have a picture now, Houston?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. I refuse to bite on this one, though. You tell us.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay. This should be getting larger, and if it is, it's the place we're coming home to.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

No matter where you travel, it's always nice to get home.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

We concur, 11. We'll be happy to have you back.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

This is Apollo 11. Signing off.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. Thank you very much, 11. That was a good demonstration and a good show. We appreciate it very much.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. We were curious to see if there was any excess moisture up around the tunnel hatch area as we saw on 10. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

It just so happens that's what we were talking about now. There is a little bit of dampness around the outside edge of the hatch, but a very, very slight amount. We've got a hose up there that we're hoping will sort of help keep it a little bit dry.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger, Mike. Thank you much. Have you seen any more water collecting on the aft bulkhead? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

No, we haven't, as a matter of fact. It's been dry in that area since we got rid of that last time.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Apollo 11 is back in PTC attitude. Standing by for thruster quieting.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. We see that. Thank you much, Mike.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Could you get a little summary of the evening news for us?

Expand selection up Contract selection down Close
Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Yes, sir. We'll have it for you momentarily. Also, a little flight plan update, Mike. If you—On page 3 113, you can delete the O2 fuel cell purge. Over.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

There is a flurry of activity in the PAO site for the evening news.

Michael Collins (CMP)

How's the weather down there? You got any rain?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. We've been having a little bit, thunderstorm type, the last couple of days. We had a pretty good rain today, and it's been overcast. A slow storm system's been moving through the area in the last couple of days, and primarily evening and afternoon thundershowers.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. We were watching a few clouds in your area through the monocular along the Texas Gulf Coast this afternoon, and we also noticed there were clouds over Baja California, which is a little bit unusual.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. Thank you for the weather report. We can't quite see that far. It seems to have cleared up outside now, according to some of the people coming in. This constant overcast in the MOCR here is a little hard to see outside.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Yes. We also noticed it was a little overcast down over—in the Antarctic ice cap, too.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. It's apparently raining pretty hard up —

Michael Collins (CMP)

How's that for one-upsmanship?

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

He may know that, but he doesn't even know whether his grass is wet or dry.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

It's apparently raining fairly hard up in Washington where the All Star game was to be played tonight. They started out, I understand, and then it was rained out and they called it off.

Michael Collins (CMP)

They need a roof on their stadium so they can catch all those flys.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Hey, Charlie, what's the preliminary outlook for the weather in our recovery area?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Stand by Buzz. It looks pretty good as far as I could tell. We got the—along the tropical convergence line there, there's a few clouds shown on the weather map I'm looking at here, but nothing of significance. Right now—Stand by. Let's see, right now in the mid—yes, at the MPL—we've got 3000 scattered, visibility 10, waves height 3 feet, is the present weather. I don't think there's anything forecast to be of significance. There are a couple of—FLIGHT just informed me that what I just gave you was the forecast. are a couple of tropical storms in the—well, not in the area of landing but in the Pacific. A storm called Claudia which is north—correction—about east of Hawaii. It's going northwest and dissipating. And there's one called Viola, which is out over Guam, and so they aren't any factor at all. It looks like it's going to be real nice for recovery.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Navy called up those special calm seas for you guys from up there on the Hudson.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Well, we might need it. We'll get a look at it tomorrow, I guess, though. We'll probably be giving it a pretty close eye.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. The RETRO's were wondering if you could fill us in on any non nominal stowage that we have on board. Just location and weight is about all they're interested in. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. We'll do some work on that and let you know, Charlie.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

And, Apollo 11, Houston. Would you please place O2 tank 1 heater to AUTO? Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

What we'll do Charlie, tomorrow, is go through and reconfigure our stowage as closely as possible to nominal. Some things that will not be nominal are as follows: the EVA visors were brought back into the command module, and we have not yet found a home for them. We'll let you know where they go. In addition, there's about 5 pounds of miscellaneous weight from the LM in compartment Able 8, and it's taking the place of the LCG's which we moved from A 8 into the suit bag. We got rid of one miscellaneous trash bag, mostly old food wrapping and also old underwear and that helmet protective visor of the CMP's. We left all that with Eagle. And those are about the only off nominals we have.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Thank you very much. We appreciate it. Out.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. We got the rates looking copasetic. You can go ahead and initiate PTC. Over.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

And Buzz, we're still not getting any data from your EKG. It looks like the only way that we're going to be able to get any is if, at your convenience, you would take your—change out your EKG leads, which are the center ones that are connected to the blue pin; and there's a spare one in the medical box. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. How many did you want me to change?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Just the center one. I'll get the right nomenclature from the Doc. Stand by. It's called the sternal EKG, which are the three center ones, and it's got—they lead into a—into the blue stringed lead ones. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. There's three of them, is that right?

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

And you want me to change all three.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative and they're all hooked together from the picture I'm looking at, and they go into the center belt, signal conditioner, and it's got the blue strain relief on it.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Yes. I checked the connectors at both ends on that. I don't guess we have a spare signal conditioner or anything like that, do we?

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Well, I can show you my heart's still working.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Charlie, what we suggest here is, before we start that, turn our two suit powers off and plug his blue lead into my blue signal conditioner and see if we can get his signal through my signal conditioner. Okay?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's a good suggestion, Neil. We concur. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay, Charlie. We're transmitting, and let's see if you get any EKG signal on the CDR at this point.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. We get some data, but it's got the same problem that we had through Buzz's signal conditioner, so apparently the lead is broken and we'd like you to change it out if you could. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. I think the problem was that the center lead had dried out. … put the new one on, and I'll see how that works. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I can't tell you how good it feels to get it off.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Yes. I can imagine.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on July 23, 1969, 1:39 a.m. UTC (50 years, 8 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Houston, Apollo 11.