Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're getting a good picture of Buzz now, but no voice modulation. And would you open up the f stop on the TV camera; try 22, please?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

That appears to be a lot better now. We're still not receiving Buzz's audio.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Good evening. I'd like to discuss with you a few of the more symbolic aspects of the flight of our mission, Apollo 11. As we've been discussing the events that have taken place in the past 2 or 3 days here on board our spacecraft, we've come to the conclusion that this has been far more than three men on a voyage to the Moon; more, still, than the efforts of a government and industry team; more, even, than the efforts of one nation. We feel that this stands as a symbol of the insatiable curiosity of all mankind to explore the unknown. Neil's statement the other day upon first setting foot on the surface of the Moon, “This is a small step for a man, but a great leap for mankind,” I believe sums up these feelings very nicely. We accepted the challenge of going to the Moon; the acceptance of this challenge was inevitable. The relative ease with which we carried out our mission, I believe, is a tribute to the timeliness of that acceptance. Today, I feel we're fully capable of accepting expanded roles in the exploration of space. In retrospect, we have all been particularly pleased with the call signs that we very laboriously chose for our spacecraft, Columbia and Eagle. We've been particularly pleased with the emblem of our flight, depicting the U.S. eagle bringing the universal symbol of peace from the Earth, from the planet Earth to the Moon; that symbol being the olive branch. It was our overall crew choice to deposit a replica of this symbol on the Moon. Personally, in reflecting on the events of the past several days, a verse from Psalms comes to mind to me. “When I consider the heavens, the work of Thy fingers, the moon and the stars which Thou hast ordained, what is man that Thou art mindful of him.”

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

The responsibility for this flight lies first with history and with the giants of science who have preceded this effort; next with the American people, who have through their will, indicated their desire; next, to four administrations, and their Congresses, for implementing that will; and then, to the agency and industry teams that built our spacecraft, the Saturn, the Columbia, the Eagle, and the little EMU, the space suit and backpack that was our small spacecraft out on the lunar surface. We would like to give a special thanks to all those Americans who built the spacecraft, who did the construction, design, the tests, and put their—their hearts and all their abilities into those crafts. To those people, tonight, we give a special thank you, and to all the other people that are listening and watching tonight, God bless you. Good night from Apollo 11.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're getting a zoom view out the window now.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Do you want to crank up PTC again; do you have some reason to hold its attitude, or what's your pleasure?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

You can crank up PTC again, Mike, any time you like. And I might add I thought that was a mighty fine TV presentation. There's certainly nothing I can add to it from down here.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, 11. I've got a few small items here: one flight plan update and some entry photography information, if you are ready to copy. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. At 180 hours 50 minutes GET, we should like to delete your oxygen fuel cell purge.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And on the entry photography, if you are going to use a fresh magazine of color interior film, we recommend the following exposure settings: f11 at 1/250, six frames per second, focus on 7 feet for the fireball; f2.0, 1/60 of a second, six frames per second, focus on 50 feet when the chutes open. If you are using a magazine, part of which has already been used for interior shots, we recommend f16 at 1/500 of a second, six frames per second, focus on 7 feet for the fireball; f2.8, 1/60 of a second, six frames per second, focus on 50 feet when the parachutes open. And we would like to know the magazine number that you are intending to use if you have a chance. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. I think we got those. We will be using a fresh one and it will be color interior. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. When you get—get it out, we would like to have the number of the magazine and the letter of the magazine relayed down.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay. And we're thinking that we might want to run some of that at 12 frames per second. And I think we can get everything from 0.5—0.5g down; that will only give us about 7.8 minutes and … frames … double that. I guess maybe just an occasional burst to 12 frames would be what we want and the rest of it at six. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

This is Houston. That plan sounds fine with us, Neil.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And lastly, we would like to know if your stowage configuration for entry is going to conform to the nominal. The RETRO's down here are anxious to get an accurate e.g. computed for you, and in particular, where the LEVVA's are being stowed. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay. We think we are going to put the LEVVA's and helmets in the hatch bag, and we'll let you know any other nonstandard stowage locations that we complete this evening.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

This is Houston. Roger. Out.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger. The magazine we'll be using for entry tomorrow is magazine M. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Understand. Magazine M as in Mike.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Your friendly Green Team going off for the night, and going off for the last time. We wish to bid you a good night and Godspeed.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Thank you. We appreciate all that fine work done by the Green Team, and we'll be thanking you in person when we get back.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We'll see you on the ground.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Really enjoyed working with all of you. Thanks very much. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

As usual, all you Greenies.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

They're all smiles down here, even the trench.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. How's our thruster firing activity? We're about ready to crank up PTC if you are.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, we'd like you to shift to an OMNI antenna configuration at the present time. We're requesting the S band antenna OMNI switch to Bravo and the S band antenna OMNI switch to OMNI. The high gain antenna track in MANUAL. Pitch minus 50, yaw 270. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. I'll do that right now.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And if Mike has a minute, we'd like to do a little bit of troubleshooting. It seems he's either flat chested or something because we've lost respiration rate on the BIOMED telemetry. That is, the ZPN trace down here is flat.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

He was shaving a little bit ago. He might have just let it slip. Hold on a moment.

Michael Collins (CMP)

All the blasted wires are all connected, is all I know.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, Mike. We had a request that you disconnect the yellow connector from the signal conditioner and verify that it looks okay, reconnect it and then, if you would, check the two electrodes that are placed one on each side of your lower rib cage. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

I bet you there's a smile on Charlesworth's face.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Cliff is not on right now. Gene Kranz just relieved him a few minutes ago.

Michael Collins (CMP)

All those wires and things look normal up here.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, Mike. We could see variations on our traces. You've connected and disconnected, but the medics still don't have a signal.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Looks like you're sending us a message of some sort.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Well, I promise to let you know if I stop breathing.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Apollo 11, this is Houston broadcasting in the blind. Request OMNI Bravo. Request OMNI Bravo. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Communication reestablished.

Unidentified crew member

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Will you confirm you're in OMNI Bravo? Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. That ought to give it to you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Mike, we're still getting a flat trace on you for the impedance pneumograph. Before you turn in this evening, you might try putting some fresh paste in the sensors, and if that doesn't work, the medics have agreed to forget about it. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Mike's off the loop right now. I'll convey that message.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Say again.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, Mike. The trace on your respiration rate is still flat. If you have time this evening before turning in, we would suggest that you try putting some fresh paste in the two electrodes that go on the side of your lower rib cage; and if that doesn't work, just give up on it.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on July 24, 1969, 12:28 a.m. UTC (49 years, 10 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Unidentified crew member

(Sound of Train)

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Hey, 11, this is Houston. You might tell Buzz not to exercise quite so strenuously. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's one—that's one on us. (Laughter)

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. Seriously, that comment was just aimed at your musical selection.

Unidentified crew member

(Sound of train)

Michael Collins (CMP)

Come on Neil, not so fast.

Unidentified crew member

(Sound of train)

Michael Collins (CMP)

You have an ergometer up here.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

What was that? Real time exercise?

Michael Collins (CMP)

Just trying to be your ergometer.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

We'd like to know what your plans are as far as turning in this evening. Our—in the flight plan we show you commencing a rest period at about 182 hours, and what are you planning to do on that? We're going to be watching the weather here, and we expect to have an update on the weather, I guess, in about half hour or 45 minutes to pass to you. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We're going to probably stick with the flight plan pretty much. We are going to—if—check the lights in the northwest corner of the U.S. and southwest corner of Canada. If we can see up that high into the northern hemisphere. Other than that, we'll be on the flight plan.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. For your information, the laser from McDonald Observatory in West Texas will be up from about 181 hours and 30 minutes, on for 1 hour. You should be able to spot the earth out of the number 1 window every time you pass roll 357 degrees and then, of course, you're in West Texas. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

How about the number 5 window?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. For the number 5 window. That'll be—every time you pass 230 degrees in roll. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

You guys are on your toes down there.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

You have a new, new star chart. You must have a new, new star chart. Huh?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Oh, we got a fresh, fresh FAO here.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, Apollo 11. How much longer do you want us to keep charging battery B?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Nominally we're looking for about another hour and a half, but what we'd like to do is continue charging until shortly before you turn in for the night. Over.