Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. We've got it. How far open do you want this the DIRECT O2 valve to be opened at this point? I guess you want it—just leave it open from that point on?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. It should go all the way open, and you can just leave it on from that point on. The intent is to completely depressurize the oxygen manifold. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. For your information the All Star game has just ended with the National League winning 9 to 3 over American. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And I have a message here for Mike that says “All the chinch bugs are gone.” Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Having done their job I guess.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Well, along with one tree, it turns out.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Yes. I heard about that. That was right before the flight.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Right. That big storm.

No contact for 1:07:37
Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Are you still up there? Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Yes, we are. But not quite so far as we were a while ago.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We concur. We just wanted to make sure that we had good COMM with you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

For general information, 11, you are now 95,970 miles out from the Earth. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Right in our own back yard.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Right in our own back yard.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Trying to come down hill a little bit now. What's our velocity?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Your velocity is 5991 feet per second.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And you are indeed coming down hill.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. I've got a flight plan update for you to give you an optimum attitude for the Earth in the number 1 window and the Moon in number 5 window. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Your attitude will be roll 12 degrees, pitch 270 degrees, yaw 0 degrees. High gain antenna angles, pitch plus 14, yaw 263. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. I copy. Roll 012, pitch 270, yaw 0. High gain antenna, pitch plus 14 and yaw 263.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And when coming out of PTC, you might be advised that your deadband has been collapsed, so follow the checklist items. Over.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on July 23, 1969, 10:40 p.m. UTC (49 years, 10 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're receiving a black signal from you right now, but we are getting TV. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

From signal strength indications, it appears that we may be locked up on a side lobe with a high gain antenna. We'd like you to go into wide bandwidth for about 15 seconds and then back to narrow. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

You have good S band signal strength now, Houston?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We're all set whenever you're ready to send.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. You're coming through loud and clear now, 11, with your patch.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Good evening. This is the Commander of Apollo 11. A hundred years ago, Jules Verne wrote a book about a voyage to the Moon. His spaceship, Columbia, took off from Florida and landed in the Pacific Ocean after completing a trip to the Moon. It seems appropriate to us to share with you some of the reflections of the crew as the modern day Columbia completes its rendezvous with the planet Earth and the same Pacific Ocean tomorrow. First, Mike Collins.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We have an LOS here.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We'll be right back with you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

In the interim, you may be interested in knowing that Jan and the children and Pat and the youngsters and Andy Aldrin are down here in the viewing room watching this evening.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We're glad to hear that.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, 11. You're back on, with Mike in the middle of the screen there.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. This trip of ours to the Moon may have looked, to you, simple or easy. I'd like to assure you that has not been the case. The Saturn V rocket which put us into orbit is an incredibly complicated piece of machinery, every piece of which worked flawlessly. This computer up above my head has a 38,000 word vocabulary, each word of which has been very carefully chosen to be of the utmost value to us, the crew. This switch which I have in my hand now, has over 300 counterparts in the command module alone, this one single switch design. In addition to that, there are myriads of circuit breakers, levers, rods, and other associated controls. The SPS engine, our large rocket engine on the aft end of our service module, must have performed flawlessly, or we would have been stranded in lunar orbit. The parachutes up above my head must work perfectly tomorrow or we will plummet into the ocean. We have always had confidence that all this equipment will work, and work properly, and we continue to have confidence that it will do so for the remainder of the flight. All this is possible only through the blood, sweat, and tears of a number of people. First, the American workmen who put these pieces of machinery together in the factory. Second, the painstaking work done by the various test teams during the assembly and retest after assembly. And finally, the people at the Manned Spacecraft Center, both in management, in mission planning, in flight control, and last, but not least, in crew training. This operation is somewhat like the periscope of a submarine. All you see is the three of us, but beneath the surface are thousands and thousands of others, and to all those, I would like to say, thank you very much.