Michael Collins (CMP)

Well, if the systems guys have anything they want chased down, we'll be happy to give you any readings or reports or what have you.

Owen Garriott (CAPCOM)

Roger. We'll think about that and see if there aren't some other tests to be usefully performed here.

Owen Garriott (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. I'll be turning things over to the Green CAP COMM at this time, and see you on the ground tomorrow.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay, Owen. I want to thank you and the whole Purple/Maroon group there for a good job helping Apollo 11.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Thanks from us to all of you. It was really appreciated.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Go ahead, Houston. Apollo 11.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. With reference to your subjective evaluation that it felt cooler in side the spacecraft last night, we reported earlier that we did indeed see a drop of about 3 degrees over the previous night. Looking back, it appears the crew of Apollo 10 reported similar feelings during the translunar and transearth coast phases. We're wondering if you could give us any indication of the relative amounts of free or condensed water in the cabin last night and the night before from which we could infer humidity. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger. That might be a little bit difficult to do. We'll take a look at the tunnel now. It does seem as though, between the dirt, we had a little bit more moisture in the tunnel. Of course, the LM hadn't been vented when we did translunar.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We were more curious about the relative amount of moisture between, say, last night and the night before, both of which would have the LM missing.

Michael Collins (CMP)

There's more moisture in the tunnel now than there has been at any previous time. Subjectively we have been unable to determine any change in—any buildup in humidity. There appears to be no moisture any other place in the spacecraft. For example, the windows are not fogging or—and various other cool spots around the spacecraft—all of them appear to be completely dry.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

This is Houston. Roger. Thank you.

Michael Collins (CMP)

How are all the “Greens” today, Bruce?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Oh, the Greens are in good shape. The actual Green Team has been here for several hours. We're dogging the watch down here to position Ron for entry. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. Understand. Did Dave Reed get to explain the lunar … at the press conference?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

No, but your comments about Bill Shaffer and the explanations were quoted in the paper last night.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Do you want to say anything more while you're on the line?

Michael Collins (CMP)

He's right. He's absolutely right.

Michael Collins (CMP)

How's old White, Bruce? Did he ever let you go get a cup of coffee when we were over on the back side?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Oh, things have been going pretty smoothly down here. He's really not that hard to get along with.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Oh, he must be mellowing.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

We've only got two of them back here right now.

Michael Collins (CMP)

He always used to make me sit at the console through the back side passes, just for training.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Well, the word we have here is—that was because whenever you came back, you had to be retrained.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Out of curiosity, on those 70 mm cameras, we figure we exposed around 300 in the LM and around a thousand in the command module; and both cameras—or all the 70 mm cameras worked just fine.

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Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. Very good. Thank you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Do you all have “Change Lima” for your entry operations checklist dated July 23? Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

I'm not sure that we hung around long enough to pick that one up.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. If you've got the entry operations checklist handy, then I'll pass it up to you. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

How can you make changes after lift off?

Michael Collins (CMP)

You sure you don't mean June?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Negative. It just came up today. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

So, you're the first to get to us. Go ahead.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. On page 6 1 of the entry out checklist down toward the bottom after “MAIN DEPLOY pushbutton,” we have three additional steps we'd like you to accomplish. The intent of this is to reduce the oxygen pressure in your manifold and to eliminate the oxygen bleed flow through the potable and waste water tanks during descent. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. We've got 6 1 out. Go ahead.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. Down at the bottom, you've got “10,000 feet MAIN PARACHUTE DEPLOY, MAIN DEPLOY pushbutton, PUSH within 1 second.” And after that step, we'd like you insert “SURGE TANK O2 valve, OFF; REPRESS PACKAGE valve, OFF; and DIRECT O2 valve, OPEN.” Do you copy?

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. Down at the bottom, after “MAIN DEPLOY pushbutton, PUSH; SURGE TANK O2, OFF; and REPRESS PACKAGE VALVE, OFF, DIRECT O2, ON” Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And then down at the very bottom of page 6 2 where you see “DIRECT O2, OFF VERIFY,” delete that step completely. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And for record purposes, this will be “Change Lima.” Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. We've got it. How far open do you want this the DIRECT O2 valve to be opened at this point? I guess you want it—just leave it open from that point on?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. It should go all the way open, and you can just leave it on from that point on. The intent is to completely depressurize the oxygen manifold. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. For your information the All Star game has just ended with the National League winning 9 to 3 over American. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And I have a message here for Mike that says “All the chinch bugs are gone.” Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Having done their job I guess.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Well, along with one tree, it turns out.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Yes. I heard about that. That was right before the flight.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Right. That big storm.

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Spoken on July 23, 1969, 8:23 p.m. UTC (49 years, 10 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

No contact for 1:07:37
No contact for 1:07:37
Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Are you still up there? Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Yes, we are. But not quite so far as we were a while ago.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We concur. We just wanted to make sure that we had good COMM with you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

For general information, 11, you are now 95,970 miles out from the Earth. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Right in our own back yard.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Right in our own back yard.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Trying to come down hill a little bit now. What's our velocity?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Your velocity is 5991 feet per second.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And you are indeed coming down hill.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. I've got a flight plan update for you to give you an optimum attitude for the Earth in the number 1 window and the Moon in number 5 window. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Your attitude will be roll 12 degrees, pitch 270 degrees, yaw 0 degrees. High gain antenna angles, pitch plus 14, yaw 263. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. I copy. Roll 012, pitch 270, yaw 0. High gain antenna, pitch plus 14 and yaw 263.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And when coming out of PTC, you might be advised that your deadband has been collapsed, so follow the checklist items. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're receiving a black signal from you right now, but we are getting TV. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

From signal strength indications, it appears that we may be locked up on a side lobe with a high gain antenna. We'd like you to go into wide bandwidth for about 15 seconds and then back to narrow. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

You have good S band signal strength now, Houston?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We're all set whenever you're ready to send.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. You're coming through loud and clear now, 11, with your patch.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Good evening. This is the Commander of Apollo 11. A hundred years ago, Jules Verne wrote a book about a voyage to the Moon. His spaceship, Columbia, took off from Florida and landed in the Pacific Ocean after completing a trip to the Moon. It seems appropriate to us to share with you some of the reflections of the crew as the modern day Columbia completes its rendezvous with the planet Earth and the same Pacific Ocean tomorrow. First, Mike Collins.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We have an LOS here.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We'll be right back with you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

In the interim, you may be interested in knowing that Jan and the children and Pat and the youngsters and Andy Aldrin are down here in the viewing room watching this evening.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We're glad to hear that.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, 11. You're back on, with Mike in the middle of the screen there.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. This trip of ours to the Moon may have looked, to you, simple or easy. I'd like to assure you that has not been the case. The Saturn V rocket which put us into orbit is an incredibly complicated piece of machinery, every piece of which worked flawlessly. This computer up above my head has a 38,000 word vocabulary, each word of which has been very carefully chosen to be of the utmost value to us, the crew. This switch which I have in my hand now, has over 300 counterparts in the command module alone, this one single switch design. In addition to that, there are myriads of circuit breakers, levers, rods, and other associated controls. The SPS engine, our large rocket engine on the aft end of our service module, must have performed flawlessly, or we would have been stranded in lunar orbit. The parachutes up above my head must work perfectly tomorrow or we will plummet into the ocean. We have always had confidence that all this equipment will work, and work properly, and we continue to have confidence that it will do so for the remainder of the flight. All this is possible only through the blood, sweat, and tears of a number of people. First, the American workmen who put these pieces of machinery together in the factory. Second, the painstaking work done by the various test teams during the assembly and retest after assembly. And finally, the people at the Manned Spacecraft Center, both in management, in mission planning, in flight control, and last, but not least, in crew training. This operation is somewhat like the periscope of a submarine. All you see is the three of us, but beneath the surface are thousands and thousands of others, and to all those, I would like to say, thank you very much.