Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. We're all listening. Go ahead.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. From the hot wires of the Public Affairs Office: Apollo 11 still dominates the news around the world. Only four nations, Communist China, North Korea, North Viet Nam, and Albania, have not yet informed their citizens of your flight and landing on the Moon. One newsman said that he has run out of ways to describe your success. Tonight, President Nixon is scheduled to watch the All Star baseball game in Washington. After the game, he will depart for the Pacific recovery area. Wednesday evening, he will fly from Johnston Island by helicopter to the Navy communications ship Arlington. Then on Thursday morning, he will reboard the helicopter and fly to the Hornet in time to witness your splashdown. Accompanying the President will be Secretary of State William Rogers and Frank Borman. They will watch the splashdown from the bridge of the recovery ship with Admiral John Sidney McCain, Jr., Commander of the Pacific Forces. Following the President's stay aboard the Hornet, he will depart for his tour of Asia and scheduled visit to Romania. Luna 15 is believed to have crashed into the Sea of Crises yesterday after orbiting the Moon 52 times. The Soviet News Agency TASS reported that “scientific” “research in near Moon space was carried out.” Sir Bernard Lovell at Jodrell Bank Observatory said that Luna 15 hit the surface of the Moon at a speed of about 300 miles per hour. Things have been relatively quiet recently in Viet Nam. GI's on patrol were observed carrying transistor radios tuned into your flight. The Armed Forces radio and TV network in Viet Nam gave the mission full coverage. Skirmishes still continue between the Egyptians and Israelis along the Suez Canal. U.N. observers there are trying to halt the action. In Washington, the House Ways and Means Committee has voted to reduce the 27.5 percent oil depletion allowance to 20 percent. We've had rain several times here in the Houston area. Today it is cloudy, and more showers are expected. On the sports front, as we mentioned earlier, the All Star game is tonight. There were no games played yesterday. Last night in New York, the Baseball Writers Association of America named Babe Ruth the greatest ball player of all time. Joe DiMaggio was named the greatest living ball player. Frank Borman made the announcements at a dinner honoring the players. Joe Namath put in a full day at the New York Jets' training camp. Five policemen had a hard time restraining about 500 kids who wanted to touch Broadway Joe. He said he feels fine and will play in the All Star game August 1, if Coach Weeb Eubank lets him. The Oilers' camp at Kerrville got wet yesterday, but the workouts continued. There have been some minor injuries, but nothing too serious. Coach Wally Lemm is satisfied so far with the workouts. The Oilers are expecting attendance by over 30.000 for the preseason game with Buffalo. Apparently, Don Meredith's announced retirement isn't expected to dampen enthusiasm, especially around here in Houston. Mario Andretti won the 200 mile Trenton Auto Race Sunday and is now the leading race driver in the U.S. Auto Club's point standings. And that's about the summary of the morning news this afternoon in Houston. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Look up the Dow Jones Industrials for us.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Stand by a minute, please.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. We see you in P00. When you can give us ACCEPT, we have a state vector and target load uplink ready for you.

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Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger, Houston. I'm going ahead and start the computer.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, we've completed the uplink. The computer's yours.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. With respect to the Dow Jones industrials, since closing on Tuesday afternoon the 15th up to about 1:05 p.m. Houston time this afternoon, why, the effect has been a net drop; that is, minus 6 points on the industrial average. So far today since opening, the Dow Jones industrial average has gone down by 11.05 after rising 1 1/2 shortly after opening. Today's performance on the utilities is a drop of 1.63, and railroads a drop of 1.58. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Every flight has to have some disadvantages, I guess.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. There is some speculation that you all are responsible for that 1 1/2 point rise right after opening.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Well, don't blame the 11 point drop on us, anyway.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. If you have a minute or so free, I wonder if we could get Mike to give us a little bit of clarification on what happened around about the time of docking. We copied him as mentioning that contact was very smooth, almost imperceptible; and we're a little bit inquisitive or curious about his remarks as to what happened after probe retraction. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. I docked in CMC AUTO, and as I said, I wasn't really sure of the moment of contact. I kept cross checking the docking probe indicators. I got two barber poles indicating that the three capture latches—not capture latches, but the three … latches had made, and we were soft docked. And at that time the situation looked very stable. So, I went to CMC FREE, glanced back out the window and it still looked stable; and I fired primary 2 bottle. And at that time, a gyration began between the two vehicles due I'm not sure to what. Perhaps the LM thrusting or perhaps it was building up prior, and I hadn't noticed it. But anyway, during the RETRACT of the probe, there were yaw—my yaw excursions of, I would guess, around 15 degrees, and I had to come back on, take the FREE switch and throw it back to AUTO, and try to damp them out; and I guess Neil was doing the same in the LM. I'll let him tell you about his side of it. And I though that we were not going to get a successful RETRACT and hard dock. However, in about—oh, I guess 6 or 8 seconds, I did hear—could see the situation damping out, and then we heard the noise indicating the docking latches had fired; and later on when I got into the tunnel, all 12 of them had properly engaged.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

And on the LM side, we were in AGS MIN deadband ATT HOLD; and at contact, I thrusted plus X; and shortly after that we had a sizable attitude oscillation and thruster firing, so we opened up the deadband to MAX and manually flew the vehicle into stable attitude during the retraction. It went to OFF after …

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Thank you very much. Out.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. I have your midcourse correction 5 PAD available when you're ready to copy.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Ready to copy.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Midcourse correction number 5, RCS/G&N: 26025, pitch and yaw trim NA, TIG 150 29 5453, minus 00048, plus all balls, plus 00001 075 159 328; HA is NA; HP plus 00230 00048 011 00048; sextant star 03 0908 382. Boresite star block, none available. Latitude plus 1102, minus 17204 11803 36275 195 03 33, GDC align, Deneb and Vega, 007 144 068, no ullage, of course, four quad thrusting. Over. Readback.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. Midcourse number 5, RCS/G&N: 26025, pitch and yaw NA, 150 29 5453, minus 00048, plus all zeros, plus 00001 075 159 328, NA, plus 00230 00048 011 00048 03 0908 382, NA three times, plus 1102, minus 17204 11803 36275 195 03 33, Deneb and Vega, 007 144 068, and four quads for the burn. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Readback correct. Out.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. Go ahead, Houston.

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Spoken on July 22, 1969, 6:05 p.m. UTC (49 years, 10 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. If Neil has a free minute, we've got a question or two regarding the CO2 partial pressure and water in the suit loop discrepancies noted yesterday. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. Was water noted in both suits or only in yours, Neil?

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

I think only in my suit.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. Can you locate that occurrence for us in time when you first noticed water in the suit, either by mission time or relation to any particular event?

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

I think it was after insertion sometime, Bruce. I don't remember exactly when. I—It was when we were in orbit and had our—after we took our helmets off.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Did you call it to us when you first noticed it, or was it sometime after when you called it?

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

I'd guess it might have been probably 20 minutes after I noticed it that I mentioned it to you.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Was this noticing the water accompanied by erratic CO2 partial pressure readings, or was that a separate problem? Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Well, the water problem evidenced itself before we noted any erratic motions of the PC02 gage.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And what was the relative sequence on selecting water separator number 2 and the secondary CO2 canister; that is, did you go to the secondary water separator first and then the secondary CO2? Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I believe we went to secondary CO2 first.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Secondary hydroxide—lithium hydroxide.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We copy. And was there any change in your suit loop —

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I should mention, Bruce, that when I went to water secondary—water separator to secondary there, I didn't notice any change. But about after 15 minutes or 20 minutes, the water stopped coming out. So maybe that was just water that was already in the loop that was still blowing out, but the secondary water separator was operating properly.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Did you make any changes in the suit loop configuration after you went from the egress mode to the cabin mode after insertion; that is, in particular, they're interested in knowing if you recall changing the diverter valve position to EGRESS at any time while you were on the secondary canister? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

No. I don't believe we did that at all, Bruce.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, 11. Thank you. That sums up our questions for now, and we'll crank these back into the engineering pipeline and see what we can come up with.