Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

No, that's fine. I just wanted to confirm that. Until 79 10, then we'll breeze around here in orbit.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. And we've got an observation you can make if you have some time up there. There's been some lunar transient events reported in the vicinity of Aristarchus. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. We just went into spacecraft darkness. Until then, why, we couldn't see a thing down below us. But now, with earthshine, the visibility is pretty fair. Looking back behind me, now, I can see the corona from where the Sun has just set. And we'll get out the map and see what we can find around Aristarchus

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We're coming upon Aristarchus right now —

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

— Okay. Aristarchus is at angle Echo 9 on your ATO chart. It's about 394 miles north of track. However, at your present altitude, which is about 167 nautical miles, it ought to be over—that is within view of your horizon: 23 degrees north, 47 west. Take a look and see if you see anything worth noting up there. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, 11. It might help us a little bit if you could give us a time of crossing of 45 west.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

You might give us a time of crossing of 45 west, and then we'll know when to start searching for Aristarchus.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. You'll be crossing 45 west at 77 04 10 or about 40 seconds from now. Over. Thirty seconds from now.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, when we lose the S-band, we'd like to get OMNI Charlie from you. And update my last, that 77 04 was the time when Aristarchus should become visible over your horizon. 77 12 is point of closest approach south of it. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. That sounds better because we just went by Copernicus a little bit ago.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We show you at about 27 degrees longitude right now.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, when a star sets up here, there's no doubt about it. One instant it's there, and the next instant it's just completely gone.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. We request you use OMNI Charlie at this time. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. Going to OMNI Charlie.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Go ahead.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. Seems to me since we know orbits so precisely, and know where the stars are so precisely, and the time of setting of a star or a planet to so very fine a degree, that this might be a pretty good means of measuring the altitude of the horizon …

Michael Collins (CMP)

Hey, Houston. I'm looking north up toward Aristarchus now, and I can't really tell at that distance whether I am really looking at Aristarchus, but there's an area that is considerably more illuminated than the surrounding area. It just has—seems to have a slight amount of fluorescence to it. A crater can be seen, and the area around the crater is quite bright.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Looking up at the same area now and it does seem to be reflecting some of the earthshine. I'm not sure whether it was worked out to be about zero phase to—Well, at least there is one wall of the crater that seems to be more illuminated than the others, and that one—if we are lining up with the Earth correctly, does seem to put it about at zero phase. That area is definitely lighter than anything else that I could see out this window. I am not sure that I am really identifying any phosphorescence, but that definitely is lighter than anything else in the neighborhood.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Can you discern any difference in color of the illumination, and is that an inner or an outer wall from the crater? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. That's an inner wall of the crater.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

No, there doesn't appear to be any color involved in it, Bruce.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. You said inner wall. Would that be the inner edge of the northern surface?

Michael Collins (CMP)

I guess it would be the inner edge of the westnorthwest part, the part that would be more nearly normal if you were looking at it from the Earth.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. Have you used the monocular on this? Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. Like you to know this quest for science has caused me to lose my E memory program, it's in here somewhere, but I can't find it.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're—we're hearing only a partial COMM. Say again please.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, we will give it a try if we have the opportunity on next—when we are not in the middle of lunch, and trying to find the monocular.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Copied you that time. Expect in the next REV you will probably be getting ready for LOI 2.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

So, let's wind this up, and since we've got some other things to talk to you about in a few minutes. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We're targeting—planning to make the LOI 2 burn now using bank A only. We'll have the PAD and everything for you next time around. Just trying to economise a little on bank B. Bank B is holding, though.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. In order to improve the communications a little bit here, we'd like to try to get you on the high gain antenna. We're recommending a pitch angle of 0, yaw 355—I say again 355, the track switch to MANUAL, and wide beamwidth. Over.

Expand selection up Contract selection down Close
Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay. You ready to switch to high gain now?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on July 19, 1969, 7:04 p.m. UTC (50 years, 4 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger. We read you. It seems to be rather marginal on the high gain.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Could you give us a time of crossing the prime meridian 150 west? Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Stand by about a half a second, here. Okay. Your time of crossing the 150 west meridian will be 77 50 05. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. We have about 6 minutes remaining until LOS, and in order that we may configure our ground lines, we'd like to know if you're still planning to have the TV up with the beginning of the next pass. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger, Houston. We'll try to have it ready.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

This is Houston. We are inquiring if it is your plan to. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

It never was our plan to; but it's in the flight plan, so I guess we'll do it.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

For use in connection with the prime meridian crossing, you have an orbital period now of 2 hours 8 minutes and 37 seconds. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. A little over 2 minutes to LOS. All your systems parameters and orbit are looking good from the ground. We have AOS on the other side at 78 23 31. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. That was 31 on the end.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

This is Apollo 11. Are you picking up our signals okay?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Affirmative. We are reading you loud and clear on voice and we have a good clear TV picture, a little bright crater in the —

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

— the bottom of the picture. I guess that's the spot on the tube.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I'm sorry about that one.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

And if you give us P00 and ACCEPT, we will uplink our new state vector and target load to you.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. One of the larger craters on the back side—I noticed a small, dark speck on the outer wall and I put the monocular on it. I was able to see—oh, an area maybe a quarter of a mile in diameter. It was really a freshlooking dark colored pit, and that seems to be in contrast with all the other fresh little craters or holes that you can perceive on the walls of any of these craters. Around this particular one there seems to be two or three of these—especially the one that caught my attention. Quite remarkable. Over.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. Do you have a location on that one?

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

No, not a precise one. I've got several pictures of it, though.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

We're getting a beautiful picture in down there now, 11. The color's coming in quite clearly, and we can see the horizon and the relative blackness of space, and without getting into the question of grays and browns, it looks, at least on our monitor, sort of a brownish gray.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

That's a good, reasonable way of describing it. It appears to me as though it made a difference just sitting back in the tunnel and gazing at all windows; it makes a difference which one you're looking out of. For example, the camera right now is looking out the number 5 window, and it definitely gives a rosier or tanner tinge, especially when you look straight through it and not at an angle. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

And if you rear back 95 or 100 degrees …

Multiple speakers

… Still holding … Okay.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

I'd say we're about 95 degrees east, coming up on Smyth's Sea.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. And for your information, we show you at an altitude of about 92 miles above the surface right now.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Could you observe a difference in the N2 pressures before LOI? It seems to me as though the two were not equal on the … B tank was a little low on pressure. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

I'm flying it in SPS minimum impulse, Houston, and it's rather difficult to keep it on a constant data. The LM wants to wander up and down. I'm not sure if it's in response to MASCONN's or what, but I can get it completely stabilized in DATA and let it alone, and in another couple of minutes it will have developed its own rate.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, we'll be moving shortly from the side window to the hatch window, and we'll try and pick up some of the landmarks that we'll be looking at as we approach the powered descent. Over.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Roger. And we're through with the uplinks; the computer is yours. You can go to BLOCK and we'll have the information on nitrogen for you shortly. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay, Houston. Several minutes ago I was exactly steady on data, and since then I have been moving toward the LM, pointed straight down toward the radius vector, and that's been despite a number of down minimum pitch impulses.