Unidentified crew member

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Checklist page F9 7; I've completed step 8, and I'd like to know what you think is ideal timing between step 8, step 9, and step 10 on that page? Over.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. We don't see any time constraint. We'd like you to go ahead and set up the wide deadband and then go through step 10 and 11. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. Will do. I don't see any constraint here, Charlie. I was just checking to make sure, because last time, I went from 8 to 9 to 10 to 11 a little bit more swiftly than I'd been doing in the past.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. Would you please select OMNI Bravo? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. How do you read on Bravo?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Roger. Reading you five-by.

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. Looks like we've got a good PTC going. It's good night from the White Team. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. See you tomorrow. Thank you for everything.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Do you have any idea where the S IVB is with respect to us?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. The S IVB is about 6000 nautical miles from you now. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. How's the PTC looking?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. The PTC looks great to us. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Hey, do you have any idea what happened to the previous one?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

We have absolutely no idea. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. Did, it look like it was all right, then just all of a sudden start diverging?

Charlie Duke (CAPCOM)

That's negative, Mike. If you'll look at the plot, which we'll save for you and let you see it postflight, it started off immediately on the first REV and just spiraled out to about—oh 20 to—20 degrees in pitch, and then it seemed to be setting up a spiral around an offset pitch point of about 20 degrees off from 90 degrees; but we didn't want to take a chance that it would become stable at that point. We thought it might diverge, and so we called you and started over again. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay, no complaints. I was just curious as to what had happened.

No contact for 8:18:45
CommTech

Goddard voice, Houston COMM TECH. Goss conference.

MSFN

You're loud and clear. How me?

CommTech

Roger. Read you the same.

MSFN

Roger.

CommTech

Madrid, Houston COMM TECH. Net 1, voice check.

CommTech

Houston COMM TECH, Madrid. I read you loud and clear.

CommTech

Roger. Read you loud and clear also.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Hello, Houston. Apollo 11.

Ronald Evans (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. Good morning.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Good morning. Are you planning a midcourse correction 4 this morning?

Ronald Evans (CAPCOM)

That's negative. Midcourse number 4 is not required. We were going to let you sleep in until about 71 hours if you'd like to turn over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. That'll be fine.

Ronald Evans (CAPCOM)

Say again, Buzz. You were cut off there.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. I'll see you at 71 hours.

Ronald Evans (CAPCOM)

Roger.

No contact for 1:44:35
Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Good morning again, Houston. Apollo 11.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger 11. Good morning. When you —

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Yes indeed. O2 fuel cell purge at 71 hours, and when you feel like copying, I've got a flight plan update containing—I guess that and some other items for you.

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Spoken on July 19, 1969, 12:35 p.m. UTC (50 years, 1 month ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Go ahead with the flight plan update.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. This is Houston. At approximately 71 hours to 72 hours, we have you down for an eat period which I imagine is probably in progress already. 71 hours: O2 fuel cell purge; 72 hours GET: CO2 filter change number 6, secondary radiator flow check. And we'll send you up a P37 block data on a 2 hour pass, pericynthion pass, return mode abort. At 73 hours 00 minutes: stop PTC at approximately 0 degrees roll. That is, when you're coming up on 0 degrees roll angle around 73 hours, we'd like you to stop PTC. And perform a P52 option 3 remaining in the PTC REFSMMAT for a drift check. 73 hours, 20 minutes: we'll give you a P27 update to the landing site REFSMMAT, LOI 1 state vector, and target load. 73 hours 30 minutes: maneuver to 000 roll, pitch, and yaw; high gain antenna angles will be pitch 0, yaw 335; and perform a P52 option 1 using the new landing site REFSMMAT. Resume the nominal flight plan at 74 hours GET. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. We'll get started on the fuel cell purge while we're eating. CO2 canister change number 6; secondary radiator flow check; copy some pads. Also at 72 hours, stop PTC 0 roll at 73; do a P52 option 3; we'll get your uplink REFSMMAT for the landing site; and at 000—let's see, now was this with the old REFSMMAT or the new REFSMMAT?

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

— … antenna and, pitch —

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

— This is with the new REFSMMAT, Buzz.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

You said you want the P52 done at that attitude with the new REFSMMAT?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. Correction on my last. At 73 20, we uplink you the new REFSMMAT. And at 73 30, we'd like you to maneuver to 0 roll, 0 pitch, 0 yaw in the old REFSMMAT. And then torque around to the new REFSMMAT and run your P52 option 1 in that same inertial attitude. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

I've got consumables update, when you're ready to copy.

Michael Collins (CMP)

I just got up, but you didn't catch me on that one.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. We're ready to copy that consumable update.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. As of GET 68 00, RCS total minus 4.5 percent, corresponding to approximately minus 53 pounds. Alfa minus 6.0 percent, minus 1.0 percent, minus 7.0 percent, minus 3.0 percent; H2 total, minus 1.2 pounds; O2 total, plus 10 pounds. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. And our readouts on board are Alfa is 82, Bravo is 84, Cocoa is 84, and Delta is 87.

Michael Collins (CMP)

And you want us to cycle the O2 and H2 fans, I imagine?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Affirmative. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. I have a status report for you.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. On sleep; CDR, CMP, 7.5; LMP, 6.5. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. 7.5, 7.5 and 6.5. And I got a few words for you here on the SPS engine performance. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. We're ready to listen.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay, 11. It turns out that the engine performance during both of your burns so far this mission has been the same as it was on engine acceptance tests. The onboard PC reading is due to a known gage calibration factor between what you've actually got in the chamber and what you're reading out on the gage. We expect single bank operation to be 90—that is, 90 psi on the gage with an actual chamber pressure of 95 psi. In dual bank operation, the chamber pressure is 94 psi on the gage with an actual of 99 psi. 80 psi on the gage on board correlates to 83 psi actual. And we recommend that you stick to an LOI termination cue of 80 psi on the gage. That is, no change to the mission rules. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Apollo 11. Roger. We got all that.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Go ahead. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Go ahead. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Go ahead. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, do you read Apollo 11?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. We're reading you loud and clear now. We were down in the noise as we switched antennas a minute or so ago. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. What sort of settings could you recommend for the solar corona? We've got the Sun right behind the edge of the Moon now.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

It's quite an erie sight. There is a very marked three dimensional aspect of having the Sun's corona coming from behind the Moon the way it is.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

And it looks as though—I guess what's giving it that three dimensional effect is the earthshine. I can see Tycho fairly clearly—at least if I'm right side up, I believe it's Tycho, in moonshine—I mean, in earthshine. And, of course, I can see the sky is lit all the way around the Moon, even on the limb of it where there's no earthshine or sunshine.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. If you'd like to take some pictures, we recommend using magazine Uniform which is loaded with high speed black and white film, interior lights off, electric Hasselblad with the 80 millimeter lens. And you're going to have to hand hold us, I guess. We're recommending an f stop of 2.8, and we'd like to get a sequence of time exposures. Over.