Michael Collins (CMP)

That was Neil. How are you reading Mike?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Loud and clear now, Mike, and we understand that you are docked.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, CDR. How do you read …?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, CDR, loud and clear, Neil.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, Apollo 11. Go ahead.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. When you commented on that quad Bravo problem at separation, you were a little weak. Could you go through what you did after you noticed the talkbacks barber pole again, please?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

We copied the—the primary and secondary propellant talkbacks on SM RCS quad Bravo 1 to barber pole on separation.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger. Roger. That is affirmative, and we moved that switch to the OPEN position, and they went back to gray. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger, Houston. Apollo 11. Go ahead.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Could you give us comments on how the transposition and docking went? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

I thought it went pretty well, Houston, although I expect I used more gas than I've been using in the simulator. The turnaround maneuver—I went PITCH ACCEL COMMAND and started to pitch up, and then when I put MANUAL ATTITUDE PITCH back to RATE COMMAND for some reason it—it stopped its pitch rate, and I had to go back to ACCEL COMMAND and hit what I thought was an extra PROCEED on the DSKY. During the course of that, we drifted slightly further away from the S-IVB than I expected. I expected to be out about 66 feet. My guess would be I was around 100 or so; and therefore, I expect I used a bit more coming back in. But, except for using a little more gas—And I'd be interested in your numbers on that—everything went nominally.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

This is Houston. Roger. We copy.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. We're working on the pressurization of the LM now, and working off the decal with CSM-LM pressure equalization. And we're down to step 13, where we're waiting for the cabin pressure to be 5, or it should be roughly 5, before we turn the REPRESS package O2 valve to FILL. Instead of 5, we're running about 4.4. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

And Houston, Apollo 11. We did put the REPRESS package O2 valve to FILL momentarily there at step 13, and we have filled the bottles back up partially. What's the pressure reading in there, Neil?

Michael Collins (CMP)

We have about 450 psi now in the three 1-pound bottles.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Stand by a second, please.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Roger. Standing by. The REPRESS package valve is now in the OFF position. What's the cabin pressure now, Buzz? Cabin pressure is now 4.5.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, Apollo 11. We think these readings are within normal tolerances. We just wanted to get your concurrence before we press down any further with these decals.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. How do you read?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Go ahead.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger. LM looks to be in pretty fine shape from about all we can see from here.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. In reference to your question on this step 13 on the decal, I understand that you have used up the contents of the REPRESS O2 package and at that time, instead of being up to 5 psi, you were reading 4.4. Is that correct?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Okay. And you want to know if you can go ahead and use additional oxygen to bring the command module up to 5.0 and continue the equalization? Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Yes. We think it's within normal tolerances, Bruce. We just wanted to get your concurrence before we press on with this procedure.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, Apollo 11. Go ahead.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. We're pressing on with the procedure.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

And 11, Houston. We have a request for you. On the service module secondary propellant fuel pressurization valve: As a precautionary measure, we'd like you to momentarily cycle the four switches to the CLOSE position and then release. As you know, we have no TM or talkback on these valve positions, and it's conceivable that one of them might also have been moved into a different position by the shock of separation. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Okay. Good idea. That's being done.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, Houston. We're doing a nonpropulsive vent on the booster at the present time. You may see some sort of a cloud coming out of it. When you're ready, I have your evasive maneuver PAD.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger, And it's coming out.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

It's a haze. It's going by toward our minus-X direction, and several small particles are moving along with it. The actual velocity is fairly high—at least it appears to be high. And we've got an O2 high—it's a little high right now.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

And, Houston, you, might be interested that out my left-hand window right now, I can observe the entire continent of North America, Alaska, and over the Pole, down to the Yucatan Peninsula, Cuba, northern part of South America, and then I run out of window.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. All 12 latches are locked.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. 11, this is Houston. Understand 12 latches locked.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. Whenever you're possessed of a free moment there, we've got this evasive maneuver PAD.

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Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Go ahead, Houston. Apollo 11 is ready to copy.

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Spoken on July 16, 1969, 5:31 p.m. UTC (51 years, 6 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Evasive maneuver SPS G&N: 63481, plus 095, minus 020; GETI 004 40 0100, plus 00051, plus all balls, plus 00190; roll is your option, pitch 213 357; NOUN 44 is NA; DELTA-VT is 00197 003 00152. The rest of the PAD is NA. No ullage. LM weight 33,290. Read back. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Standing by for your readback. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. Do you read? Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Do you read? Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

All of a sudden there, we heard a little click, and the signal strength began to start dropping off. Your transmissions were cut off very abruptly. How do you read now?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Loud and clear. We had a handover to Madrid about the time I was—I guess halfway through the PAD. If you could give me the last value you read, I'll pick up there. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Okay. Start with DELTA-VZ. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. DELTA-VZ is plus 00190, roll your option, pitch 213 357, and NOUN 44 is NA. DELTA-VT 00197 003 00152. The rest of the PAD is NA, and no ullage. LM weight 33,290. Read back. Over.

Buzz Aldrin (LMP)

Roger, Houston. Evasive maneuver SPS G&N: 63481, plus 095, minus 020 004 40 0100, plus 00051, plus all zeros, plus 00190, roll crew option, 213 357, NA, 00197 003 00152, no ullage, LM weight 33,290. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, this is Houston. Readback correct. Out.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

We'd like to arm our logic switches.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay. Mark logic 1 and 2 armed.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We show the logic arm, and you're GO for PYRO arm.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, we're ready for LM ejection.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. You're GO for LM ejection.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Houston, we are SEP. We have a CRYO PRESS light.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. Copy. CRYO PRESS light.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger, 11. We recommend you turn the O2 fans on manually and ensure that the O2 heaters are in the AUTOMATIC position.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Roger. O2 heaters are ON, and we're going to cycle the O2 fans now.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. O2 heaters to AUTO, or you can watch them in the ON position, and O2 fans manual ON.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this ls Houston. Over.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. In reference to your question on RCS usage: it looks like you are about 18, maybe 20 pounds below nominal at the present time. No problem at all. Over.

Michael Collins (CMP)

I wanted to be 18 or 20 pounds above nominal, babe.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

11, Houston. Your systems are looking good. We're standing by for the burn.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, Apollo 11. Could you confirm that pitch gimbal motor number 1 turned off? We just shut all four off, and we got a questionable indication on the ECS on pitch 1.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Houston, did you copy our residuals?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. Stand by, please.

Michael Collins (CMP)

Go ahead, Houston. Did you copy our residuals?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Roger. We got 00 and 0.2, it looks like.

Michael Collins (CMP)

We had 0.1 while ago. It's—just went to 0.2.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

That EMS DELTA-V counter is minus 4.0.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

And how about pitch gimbal 1? Can you confirm that OFF?

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Can you stand by just a second on that? At the present time we cannot confirm it OFF. We saw a current drop indicating that several gimbal motors had gone off. We'll be back with you in just a second on it. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay, If necessary, we can recycle it.

Bruce McCandless (CAPCOM)

Apollo 11, this is Houston. If you'll go ahead and cycle pitch gimbal motor number 1 on and then off and give us a Mark, and we'll tell you what we see. Over.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

Okay, fine. It's coming back on. Ready.

Neil Armstrong (CDR)

And it's going back off. Ready.